7 Apr 2008

Is decorative art an investment?

With so much being written and discussed on art, it is no surprise that most people would like to own a few works of art. But, unfortunately with rising prises the gap between art lovers and artworks has significantly increased. Therefore, even if one covets a Subodh Gupta or a TV Santosh, very few may actually be able to afford them. It is no surprise then that people look for suitable alternatives or substitutes. And, this is where decorative art finds its niche. Paintings and assemblages are growing in popularity. Often these are made by hobby painters and other small time artists and although they may be aesthetically pleasing and coordinating well with the décor, these are unlikely to be a sound investment from a financial angle.

In fact, thanks to the interest in everything related to art, the decorative art industry is growing and thriving. They are quick to produce artworks that have a mass appeal - brightly coloured landscapes, so called abstracts and reproductions of famous paintings form some of the popular choices. Ornate, elaborate and ‘fancy’ frames help in enhancing the visual factor. One has to admit these fit well into the interior décor scheme and add an element of ‘art’ on the walls. Costing anywhere from Rs 5000 to up to even a lakh or more these have become an integral part of home and office décor and no one can deny their ‘trendy’ look.
The biggest advantage with such artwork is that it can be customized specifically to the client’s needs. Furnishings, wall colours, and other accents can be coordinated with the artwork to give a unique feel. The disadvantage, if it can be called that is that these can hardly ever be a financial investment and will therefore lack in resale value. But then as most buyers who opt for such works will be looking at it from a different perspective, it is a win-win situation for all.

(Published in Financial Times)
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