21 Nov 2017

Art News: Re-presentation of Reality in Contemporary Art

Re-presentation of Reality in Contemporary Art 

 22nd Nov at 5.30 pm at Reves Art Gallery, Bangalore


 Re-presentation of Reality in Contemporary Art   22nd Nov at 5.30 pm at Reves Art Gallery, Bangalore

Introduction: All works of art are representations of reality, whether that reality is made up of sensory perceptions, an inner world or a fictitious account. The various styles or forms of art making suggest different ways of looking at reality.  In today's context, mediums such as television and film, and technology such as virtual reality offer transformative experiences with varied representations of the reality and of imaginary realms.

New media and technologies have opened up possibilities, breaking barriers of time and space in two dimensional media, making it possible to simulate experiences involved in viewing and engaging with art. It also allows an amalgamation of the personal and the popular in novel ways.
The all pervasive nature of the Internet and wide use of technology have impacted art production and consumption, allowing multiple ways of creating and engaging with contemporary art.

About the Panelists

Murali Cheeroth 

Murali Cheeroth has exhibited in over 100 significant shows across the globe in the last two decades. His visual works refer to a wide variety of sources in the cultural sphere and contain within them a deep conversation with the history of representation in visual media, fine art, cinema, music and architecture. Within the context of the history of visual representation, his current explorations include the architecture of the city, urbanization and urban cultures. He looks closely at the ideas of re-construction, infrastructure, technology, speed and change, intersections of local and the global, multiple layers of urban identities and so on.

Some of his major exhibitions include ‘Passage to India’ – the New Indian Art from the Frank Cohen collection in UK (2009); Indian Art summit in New Delhi, SH contemporary Art Fair, Shanghai, Chicago Art Fair and London Art Fair in 2010, Colombo Beinnale, 2012, Chalo India – A group show of Contemporary Indian Artists at Basel Art Centre, 2014. Hotel Maria Kapel Korte Achterstraat 2a1621 GA Hoorn NL-2015, Art fair in Torino, Italy2015, The 2nd international art exhibition of the Silk Road, Shanxi Art Museum, China-2015. His art education includes a BFA and MFA from Shantiniketan, West Bengal and advanced computer diploma in digital media.

Ravikumar Kashi 

Ravikumar Kashi is an artist who works in different mediums such as painting, sculpture, photography and installation. His works combine or cut across defined expectations from these mediums. His idea / concept driven works are layered and connect with the viewer in multiple ways. Desire, decay and death are a major concern in his works along with introspection.

Kashi was born in Bangalore in 1968. He completed his B.F.A. from College of Fine Arts, Bangalore in 1988; M.F.A. from Faculty of Fine Arts, M.S. University, Baroda in 1990; and M.A. in English from Mysore University, in 1995. He learnt handmade papermaking from Glasgow School of Art, U.K. He also learnt Hanji, traditional Korean papermaking, from Jang Ji Bang, Korea. He has shown his works in solo shows and curated shows across the world in galleries, art fairs, biennales and museums. He has received National award from Lalit Kala Akademi, Delhi and two awards from Karnataka Lalit Kala Academy and one from Karnataka Shilpa Kala Academy for his works. He writes on art in Kannada and English. Two of his books, 'Anukta' and 'Kannele' have been published from AkshsraPrakashana, Hegggodu. His book 'Kannele' has received Karnataka Sahitya Academy award. He teaches at RV School of Architecture and Acharya School of Design as adjunct visiting faculty.

Shanthamani. M

Shanthamani. M has done a Papermaking Course from Glasgow, Scotland after finishing her Master of Arts (Fine) in Painting from the M.S. University, Baroda. Her Bachelor of Fine Arts in Painting is from CAVA, Mysore University. Her solo exhibitions abroad were “Neither Tree nor Ash” at Suzanne Tarasieve Gallery, Paris, France in 2016 and “Carbon Myths” at Gallery, Helene Lamarque, curated by Anne Maniglier, Miami, Florida, the USA in 2010.

Her participation in the Kochi Muziris Biennale, India 2014, in Art Brussels, represented by Suzanne Tarasieve Gallery, Brussels, in India Art Fair, New Delhi 2012, in “Critical Mass” Tel Aviv Museum, curated by Tami Katz-Freiman, Rotem Ruff, Tel Aviv, Israel, in “River, Body & Legends” a corpus multimedia presentation with two Women artists at Matighar, Indira Gandhi National Centre for Arts, New Delhi 2003, in the two person show held at Galerie Muller & Plate, Munich 2001 and the 10th Triennale-India underline her credentials as a contemporary artist.

In 2017 she was Artist in Residence at Cité Des Arts, Paris and in 2013 she participated in the International Bamboo workshop with the students of Ensad, Paris, in Saline Royale.

Nalini S Malaviya

She is a Bangalore based art critic and consultant. She has been writing for the media since 2003, and has been an art columnist for Financial Times (Delhi and Bangalore) and Bangalore Mirror. She has contributed to Times of India, Sunday Herald, Art and Deal, Art Etc., Art Journal, Art Fair and Lalit Kala Contemporary.

Her curatorial projects include Reimagining: (Un)Reality and Space, Irreverent Gene, Polynomials of Relevance and the ongoing Parallax of Visual Memories. She has published papers on Art, Artists and Society – Catalysing Social Change, and Linear Progressions: Tracing the Line in Karnataka for the Karnataka Lalithkala Academy Journal.

Some of her prefatory essays for art catalogues include 'Feeling Absence' a photography show by Shibu Arakkal, ‘Icons in our Midst’, New Delhi, essays for Yusuf Arakkal's catalogues and books and for artists Gurudas Shenoy, Milind Nayak and Suresh K Nair among others. She was on the Jury for the Lalit Kala Akademi National Exhibition 2017.

An occasional fiction writer, Nalini has published short stories as part of various anthologies, The Shrinking Woman, The Curse of the Bird and Bhelpuri. She publishes www.artsceneindia.com, a popular blog cum Ezine featuring art news, events and articles. She can be reached on nalini.indianart@gmail.com


Venue
Reves Art Gallery
Address;#32,Yedla's 3rd Floor,
100 ft Maranahalli Road,
Sangam Circle,8th Block Jayanagar
Bangalore -560082
Tel -080 48663224
Mob +91 9901931314

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13 Oct 2017

Art in Interiors: Buying Art for the Festive Season

Fresh artworks can infuse a new life in your surroundings and add a creative flair to the décor


The festive season is a great time to renovate and redesign interiors and add finishing touches to the décor. A beautifully designed space is incomplete without good art. Paintings on the wall, sculptures and installations in open spaces, murals painted directly on wall surfaces, assemblages and tabletop sculptures among a host of other options offer multiple ways to individualize interiors and add that creative flair to the décor. The festive season is therefore a great time to buy art for display in your home and also as a gift for loved ones. 
Buying Art for the Festive Season, Art in Interiors, Art Scene India, Image courtesy pixabay.com
  • When buying art, it is best to buy original art by well-known artists, which is not only a great investment but also adds class and personality to the décor. Buying fresh artworks can infuse a new life in your surroundings. Colours from the painting can be repeated or coordinated in the furnishings and even wall colours. And, one can actually decide on furniture, architectural details, for instance create wall niches to display art, flooring, drapes and other furnishing and accessories based on the art.
  • Also, art can be purchased as a basis for decorating interiors or selected according to the existing décor. For instance, when renovating, select an artwork which can provide a theme for the décor and can even help in choosing the décor style, for instance, ethnic, modern or eclectic, for that particular space or the entire home according to one’s preferences. Look for artworks which appeal to you and then evaluate the purchase based on the available space, wall surface, size and budget.
  • Commission an artist to do an artwork which is exactly to your specifications in terms of space, size, colours and subject. Discuss the concept and your requirements with the artist to chalk out a blueprint that matches perfectly. Paint an entire wall around a festive theme or paint a piece of furniture in multi coloured hues. It could be an abstract rendition or a work in pop art. There are immense possibilities when you work with an artist directly.
  • Folk art in vibrant hues is also a good option during the festive season; these are priced affordably and also explore traditional celebratory themes. Buy from galleries which promote folk art where you can purchase exclusive pieces, rather than mass produced images.
Buying Art for the Festive Season, Art in Interiors, Art Scene India, Image courtesy pixabay.com

 Display


To ensure the focus remains on the art piece, the space should be clutter free and the painting well lit. When putting up large paintings it is best to space them out. Save oversized paintings for large areas. Small paintings that reflect a theme or a colour scheme can be grouped on a wall; an odd number is visually more pleasing to the eye.

The wall surface and its size can also be used as a guide to select a set of paintings, for instance, paintings can be grouped vertically on a narrow strip of wall. In passages, more than one painting can be hung on the wall to create a visual diversion in a functional space that is unexciting by itself. Similarly, a set of small paintings in the kitchen is better than having a single large one.

Paintings are typically hung on walls, however, they can also be displayed on a floor easel, which is a great way to fill up spaces; it is especially useful when you don’t want to put nails in the wall. Smaller paintings can be displayed on tabletops with the help of small easels or can be rested against books.


Art can be accentuated with the help of ceiling-mounted spotlights or recessed lights as direct light can damage the paintings.

Published in Times of India, Bangalore
Images courtesy pixabay

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30 Sep 2017

Art News: apexart Open Call for Group Exhibitions 2018-19


apexart has been making people think for more than 20 years with innovative and unique approaches to programming. Fewer politics and more transparency resulting in more meritocratic and provocative exhibitions in NYC and around the world.

apexart exhibitions are selected from hundreds of anonymous proposals by an international jury of more than 200 people. Who you know doesn’t matter, the quality of your idea and how well you communicate it does. When an exhibition proposal is selected for apexart’s program season, it means that the idea is seen as compelling and worth developing by a large diverse jury that wants to see it transformed from a proposal into an exhibition.

apexart exhibitions feature works about everything, from anywhere, by anyone. If you follow what we do, you might discover something new or end up contributing to our programming.

In 2017, Animal Intent explored creature creativity, Promises to Keep presented performance art by women Pakistani artists, and Fellow Travelers explored the intersections of science fiction and migration narratives. apexart has also held exhibitions in places like Tarrafal, Cape Verde – examining histories of post-colonial prisons in Glimmer of Freedom – and Tbilisi, Georgia – probing the legacy of Soviet Cosmonautics in Illegal Kosmonavtika.

apexart awards a budget of $10,000 to each selected exhibition and its related programming, and organizers receive a $2,000 honorarium for coordinating the project and writing the exhibition essay.

Proposals for group exhibitions in our NYC exhibition space will be accepted from October 1-31, 2017.

To learn more about how to submit your 500-word exhibition proposal, visit apexart.org/opencalls.php.

Art News: apexart Open Call for Group Exhibitions 2018-19, apexart.opencall.nyc18, https://apexart.org/images/rochester/press/cantor.jpg

Sponsored post

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27 Sep 2017

A Tribute to Artist M.B. Patil

In this insightful article, H.A. Anil Kumar contemplates M.B. Patil’s artistic contribution to the arts, and discovers he has made a statement by just being the way he was and that for him, the act was more relevant than the product

Artist mb patil, Image courtesy pramilalochan.blogspot.com
It was already two decades since he had retired as an artist employed with the State Government (Department of Information and Broadcast), when M.B.Patil (born: Tikota, Bijapur, 1939-2017) passed away recently. When he had freshly retired in the late 1990s and held a solo show at ‘Images’ gallery, Bengaluru, another artist-friend of his, K.T.Shiva Prasad had inaugurated it and given a piece of advice to the exhibitor: “Patil has retired now as an employed-artist, let him be creative from now on”. Most in the crowd smiled, giggled and laughed at this tongue-in-cheek remark, while Patil himself had his usual smile, which was not easy to decipher. It was a prejudice that ‘an artist who is not a freelancer is not creative enough’ that was unveiled and vented out during this occasion. Artistic activities are bound to be defined by what art means in any given, specific situation.

Patil’s artistic works might be as mysterious as his smile was: his works can be broadly divided, style-wise, into three categories: the collages, folksy images and his demonstrations, mainly portraiture. The burnt-wood style, for which he has been often so remembered, squarely fits into his folksy style. Perhaps painterly folk representation was already a tradition among Karnataka artists. Like many of his contemporaries (Chandranath Acharya, R.M.Hadapad, S.G.Vasudev), he did meddle a bit with the art of art direction in a few docu-drama films. Often some artists of Karnataka have been so varied in their styles that any amount of categorization style-wise or otherwise, would become impossible (ex: the visual works of R.M.Hadapad and Shivarama Karantha’s literary oeuvre). On the contrary, some artists are so well known for their unique styles, that there are even too many imitators of them; and those who generated the style themselves get creatively imprisoned in this demand for the ‘politics-of-imitation’.

15 Sep 2017

Artistic Touch to Festive Decor

Adapting a décor which is constructed around traditional thematic elements is a great way to highlight rich ancient content in a visual format and to create an interesting and unusual décor

This month as the festivities continue, every day of Dussehra is celebrated with great joy and fervour. Rich in symbolism and with a specific cultural and religious connotation each day is associated with traditional rituals and is celebrated accordingly. The ninth and the tenth days of Dussehra are celebrated as Ayudha Pooja and Vijayadashmi. During the festivals, traditionally weapons were worshipped; however these days tools related to respective professions such as electronic gadgets are also worshipped. Goddess Saraswati as the symbol of knowledge, music and arts is offered prayers to invoke her blessings. The importance of celebrating these festivals in a traditional manner helps in emphasizing their significance and also in inculcating cultural values in the younger generation.
Artistic Touch to Festive Decor by Nalini Malaviya, Art in Interiors, Art Scene India
Artist Shraddha Rathi, Image courtesy Rupali & Gaurav Bhatia
During this occasion, traditional arts and crafts can be used in décor to create an ethnic ambience that enhances the festive spirit, as well. Mysore and Tanjore paintings and folk and tribal art with its symbolism associated with festivities are some of the artworks that enrich the environment. Look for traditional paintings that depict scenes from the epics and narrate mythological stories. Oleographs and prints of paintings by Raja Ravi Varma and his contemporaries depicting vignettes from mythological texts add a great interest to the décor in terms of rarity, beauty and traditional significance.

Adapting the décor by accessorising around traditional thematic elements is a great way to highlight rich ancient content in a visual format and to create interesting and unusual décors. Art based on mythology and legends adds to the visual narrative and its rendition can be either traditional or contemporary.
Artistic Touch to Festive Decor by Nalini Malaviya, Art in Interiors, Art Scene India
Image courtesy pixabay

For instance, many contemporary artists transcribe text from religious books and scriptures on their paintings and also sculptures and installations which can add an interesting dimension to the festive décor. Incidentally, a few artists also paint musicians on their canvas and create sculptures around musical themes. These can form the perfect accessories in the décor.

The significance of music, musical instruments and other symbols of fine arts, learning and knowledge is primary during Ayudha Pooja and Vijayadashmi. A creative display of musical instruments, especially vintage instruments which exhibit a fine craftsmanship make for an interesting addition in the décor. Antique wood and brass instruments are not only rare, but also exceptionally beautiful and must be displayed with care. These can form the focal point in the décor and can be exhibited on raised platforms or pedestals. Use appropriate and creative lighting fixtures to highlight the aesthetic elements and craftsmanship of rare artefacts.

Similarly, unusual and antique statuettes, figurines and silver and brassware emphasise ethnic nuances and contribute to a traditional look and can be used as part of the décor or as functional objects.


The writer is an art consultant and curator

Published in Times Property, Bangalore 

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9 Sep 2017

Terra Firma in New Delhi

Looking for balance and harmony in nature


Terra Firma presents recent works by four leading artists of Karnataka - Milind Nayak, Gurudas Shenoy, Shirley Mathew and Praveen Kumar at the Habitat Centre, New Delhi. Their works relate to the existing urban scenario and reflect on issues related to humanity and its co-existence with nature. All four artists are proficient at expressing structural and natural forms, in various medium and distinctive colour palettes. Their paintings evoke poignancy and deep contemplation as they explore the urban landscape with all its inherent beauty and conflicts.
 Terra Firma in New Delhi, group show by 4 Karnataka artists, Art Scene India

24 Aug 2017

Art News: Heritage ‘per square feet’ at Venkatappa Art Gallery

 Measured per square feet from soil to sky!

Heritage ‘per square feet’ at Venkatappa Art GalleryThird in the Sambhrama series, Heritage ‘per square feet’, presents works by Mysore artists in an exhibition curated by Shoaib Chadkhan and Anil Chandran. The show offers paintings, performance, talk and panel discussion to probe, inquire and explore the subject in varied dimensions. The Karnataka artists' resistance to the adoption of Venkatappa Art Gallery (VAG) began in February 2016, and saw a series of artistic events and protests since then. 
As part of VAG Forum's ongoing artistic activities towards a creative reclamation of public space, organizing an art exhibition/event for 10 days once in 45 days, has been taken up by the VAG Forum, which comes under the name 'Sambhrama'.

Ganesha in Multiple Forms


Ganesha, symbolic of new beginnings, success, wisdom and generosity is worshipped on Ganesh Chaturthi, a Hindu festival that reveres the elephant God. The ten-day festival is celebrated starting on the fourth day of the Hindu luni-solar calendar month Bhadrapada, which typically falls in the months of August or September.

S.G.Vasudev, GANESHA 31cms x 31cms  Medium: Relief in copper
S.G.Vasudev, 31cms x 31cms, Relief in copper
The festival is marked with installation of Ganesha clay idols in homes, or in public spaces on elaborate pandals. It ends on the tenth day after start, wherein the idol is carried in a public procession with music and group chanting, then immersed in a nearby water body such as a river or ocean, thereafter the clay idol dissolves and Ganesha is believed to return to Mount Kailasha to Parvati and Shiva (source - Wikipedia)

With greater environmental awareness, there is an emphasis on eco-friendly materials  to minimise pollution of water bodies.

As the festival marks Ganesha's birthday, and celebrates him as the god of good beginnings, prosperity and obstacle remover, he is worshipped across the country with equal fervour during festivals, rituals and other celebrations.

18 Aug 2017

Bangalore Launch: 'Intelligent Field' by Surendra Kumar Sagar

'Intelligent Field' 

a new book by Surendra Kumar Sagar

'Intelligent Field` is Surendra Kumar Sagar's second book on science and philosophy with a similar objective as his first book 'SIX WORDS'  which aims to establish a model of philosophy that can lead towards convergence of religion with science to end conflicts and wars.
Intelligent Field a book by Surendra Kumar Sagar, launch at TERI, Bangalore, Art Scene India


17 Aug 2017

In Silence the Secret Speaks by Seema Kohli

The Golden Web
By 
Anjana Chandak

Anjana Chandak responds evocatively to the narrative performance by artist Seema Kohli, held recently at the National Gallery of Modern Art (NGMA) Bengaluru.

Poetry is not when you find a word rhyming with a word but poetry is created when you can find a word rhyming exactly with your feeling…And this is what artist Seema Kohli, who donned the cap of poetess made me feel, performing her poetic narration, ‘In Silence the Secret Speaks...’

The mirror pool at the NGMA provided the perfect womb to nurture the spirit of the artist who merged with the art through her own reflection. She transcended her paintings into verbal form through her palette of myriad emotions, painting it line by line; creating and narrating.
In Silence the Secret Speaks by Seema Kohli, narrative performance, Bangalore, writer Anjana Chandak for Art Scene India, Images courtesy writer

9 Aug 2017

Reasons To Visit The 2017 Venice Biennale

Reasons To Visit The 2017 Venice Biennale

by 
Shraddha Rathi

Contemporary artist, Shraddha Rathi shares her experience from her recent visit to the Venice Biennale and discovers how this international art exhibition combines the performing and visual arts in an ideation lab to create an ambience that involves all the senses.

Venice Biennale, Image courtesy Shraddha Rathi, Art Scene India
La Biennale de Venezia, the 57th international art exhibition titled ‘Viva Arte Viva’ curated by Christine Macel celebrates art, artists and the process of creation. Although, contemporary art documents and captures today's reality, the world itself is transforming and evolving with every passing moment. At this exhibition too, at times the exhibits reflect facts and reality, or give voice to a purpose, while at other moments it just celebrates the present.

This Biennale is mostly about an idea, where the material is a powerful medium of expression. The inventive use of materials to express an idea while playing with its strengths creates expansive, ingenious and successful forms of communication. In a cornucopia of materials, you experience a vast variety ranging from glass, bone, concrete, metal, wood, coffee and a whole lot of textile based works, apart from paintings, photographs and videos.


13 Jul 2017

Art and the Question of Authorship and Ownership in the Internet Era

 Art and the Question of Authorship and Ownership in the Internet Era

by  
Narendra Raghunath

In this article, Narendra Raghunath, visual artist and faculty, Srishti Institute of Art, Design and Technology, Bangalore draws on personal experience and discusses the complexities of authenticity, authorship and ownership rights of art and the 'image' in the contemporary art world.

A couple of years ago, I received an odd request from an unknown person in New York, to authenticate two works of mine. The work looked like mine, except it had some colour fading. It also had my name on the left bottom part in English, as I often write. The only problem was I had no Idea of such a sale or transfer. On further inquiry, I learnt that he sourced the work from a struggling Indian art student. During those days, if anyone would image search my work, Google strangely enough, showed a popular Hollywood actress’s name! This Indian student smartly used that opportunity and somehow managed to convince this poor chap that this actress was a big collector of my work.

Art and the Question of Authorship and Ownership in the Internet Era by Narendra Raghunath, Art Scene India
During that period, I also had a website where I occasionally published some of my explorations with the caption that ‘none of the works are for sale’. This smart student utilized all these to his advantage to fleece this investor – for a cool $4,800 - for the downloaded prints. But, once the collector began to have doubts about the signature in the authentication letter, he contacted me for verification. The entire episode filled me with mirth. I informed the buyer that there was a colour issue with the print and offered to send him a new set of prints of the same works with my pencil signature (courier costs to be borne by the collector). He happily agreed, and as I did not want the Indian student to get caught in a serious crime in the US, I left it that.

This entire episode provoked me into a deep philosophical question of authenticity of authorship and ownership of an artwork. History of art is filled with stories where the artists and their families died in poverty while their work, later on, made many others billionaires.