13 Oct 2017

Art in Interiors: Buying Art for the Festive Season

Fresh artworks can infuse a new life in your surroundings and add a creative flair to the décor


The festive season is a great time to renovate and redesign interiors and add finishing touches to the décor. A beautifully designed space is incomplete without good art. Paintings on the wall, sculptures and installations in open spaces, murals painted directly on wall surfaces, assemblages and tabletop sculptures among a host of other options offer multiple ways to individualize interiors and add that creative flair to the décor. The festive season is therefore a great time to buy art for display in your home and also as a gift for loved ones. 
Buying Art for the Festive Season, Art in Interiors, Art Scene India, Image courtesy pixabay.com
  • When buying art, it is best to buy original art by well-known artists, which is not only a great investment but also adds class and personality to the décor. Buying fresh artworks can infuse a new life in your surroundings. Colours from the painting can be repeated or coordinated in the furnishings and even wall colours. And, one can actually decide on furniture, architectural details, for instance create wall niches to display art, flooring, drapes and other furnishing and accessories based on the art.
  • Also, art can be purchased as a basis for decorating interiors or selected according to the existing décor. For instance, when renovating, select an artwork which can provide a theme for the décor and can even help in choosing the décor style, for instance, ethnic, modern or eclectic, for that particular space or the entire home according to one’s preferences. Look for artworks which appeal to you and then evaluate the purchase based on the available space, wall surface, size and budget.
  • Commission an artist to do an artwork which is exactly to your specifications in terms of space, size, colours and subject. Discuss the concept and your requirements with the artist to chalk out a blueprint that matches perfectly. Paint an entire wall around a festive theme or paint a piece of furniture in multi coloured hues. It could be an abstract rendition or a work in pop art. There are immense possibilities when you work with an artist directly.
  • Folk art in vibrant hues is also a good option during the festive season; these are priced affordably and also explore traditional celebratory themes. Buy from galleries which promote folk art where you can purchase exclusive pieces, rather than mass produced images.
Buying Art for the Festive Season, Art in Interiors, Art Scene India, Image courtesy pixabay.com

 Display


To ensure the focus remains on the art piece, the space should be clutter free and the painting well lit. When putting up large paintings it is best to space them out. Save oversized paintings for large areas. Small paintings that reflect a theme or a colour scheme can be grouped on a wall; an odd number is visually more pleasing to the eye.

The wall surface and its size can also be used as a guide to select a set of paintings, for instance, paintings can be grouped vertically on a narrow strip of wall. In passages, more than one painting can be hung on the wall to create a visual diversion in a functional space that is unexciting by itself. Similarly, a set of small paintings in the kitchen is better than having a single large one.

Paintings are typically hung on walls, however, they can also be displayed on a floor easel, which is a great way to fill up spaces; it is especially useful when you don’t want to put nails in the wall. Smaller paintings can be displayed on tabletops with the help of small easels or can be rested against books.


Art can be accentuated with the help of ceiling-mounted spotlights or recessed lights as direct light can damage the paintings.

Published in Times of India, Bangalore
Images courtesy pixabay

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30 Sep 2017

Art News: apexart Open Call for Group Exhibitions 2018-19


apexart has been making people think for more than 20 years with innovative and unique approaches to programming. Fewer politics and more transparency resulting in more meritocratic and provocative exhibitions in NYC and around the world.

apexart exhibitions are selected from hundreds of anonymous proposals by an international jury of more than 200 people. Who you know doesn’t matter, the quality of your idea and how well you communicate it does. When an exhibition proposal is selected for apexart’s program season, it means that the idea is seen as compelling and worth developing by a large diverse jury that wants to see it transformed from a proposal into an exhibition.

apexart exhibitions feature works about everything, from anywhere, by anyone. If you follow what we do, you might discover something new or end up contributing to our programming.

In 2017, Animal Intent explored creature creativity, Promises to Keep presented performance art by women Pakistani artists, and Fellow Travelers explored the intersections of science fiction and migration narratives. apexart has also held exhibitions in places like Tarrafal, Cape Verde – examining histories of post-colonial prisons in Glimmer of Freedom – and Tbilisi, Georgia – probing the legacy of Soviet Cosmonautics in Illegal Kosmonavtika.

apexart awards a budget of $10,000 to each selected exhibition and its related programming, and organizers receive a $2,000 honorarium for coordinating the project and writing the exhibition essay.

Proposals for group exhibitions in our NYC exhibition space will be accepted from October 1-31, 2017.

To learn more about how to submit your 500-word exhibition proposal, visit apexart.org/opencalls.php.

Art News: apexart Open Call for Group Exhibitions 2018-19, apexart.opencall.nyc18, https://apexart.org/images/rochester/press/cantor.jpg

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27 Sep 2017

A Tribute to Artist M.B. Patil

In this insightful article, H.A. Anil Kumar contemplates M.B. Patil’s artistic contribution to the arts, and discovers he has made a statement by just being the way he was and that for him, the act was more relevant than the product

Artist mb patil, Image courtesy pramilalochan.blogspot.com
It was already two decades since he had retired as an artist employed with the State Government (Department of Information and Broadcast), when M.B.Patil (born: Tikota, Bijapur, 1939-2017) passed away recently. When he had freshly retired in the late 1990s and held a solo show at ‘Images’ gallery, Bengaluru, another artist-friend of his, K.T.Shiva Prasad had inaugurated it and given a piece of advice to the exhibitor: “Patil has retired now as an employed-artist, let him be creative from now on”. Most in the crowd smiled, giggled and laughed at this tongue-in-cheek remark, while Patil himself had his usual smile, which was not easy to decipher. It was a prejudice that ‘an artist who is not a freelancer is not creative enough’ that was unveiled and vented out during this occasion. Artistic activities are bound to be defined by what art means in any given, specific situation.

Patil’s artistic works might be as mysterious as his smile was: his works can be broadly divided, style-wise, into three categories: the collages, folksy images and his demonstrations, mainly portraiture. The burnt-wood style, for which he has been often so remembered, squarely fits into his folksy style. Perhaps painterly folk representation was already a tradition among Karnataka artists. Like many of his contemporaries (Chandranath Acharya, R.M.Hadapad, S.G.Vasudev), he did meddle a bit with the art of art direction in a few docu-drama films. Often some artists of Karnataka have been so varied in their styles that any amount of categorization style-wise or otherwise, would become impossible (ex: the visual works of R.M.Hadapad and Shivarama Karantha’s literary oeuvre). On the contrary, some artists are so well known for their unique styles, that there are even too many imitators of them; and those who generated the style themselves get creatively imprisoned in this demand for the ‘politics-of-imitation’.

15 Sep 2017

Artistic Touch to Festive Decor

Adapting a décor which is constructed around traditional thematic elements is a great way to highlight rich ancient content in a visual format and to create an interesting and unusual décor

This month as the festivities continue, every day of Dussehra is celebrated with great joy and fervour. Rich in symbolism and with a specific cultural and religious connotation each day is associated with traditional rituals and is celebrated accordingly. The ninth and the tenth days of Dussehra are celebrated as Ayudha Pooja and Vijayadashmi. During the festivals, traditionally weapons were worshipped; however these days tools related to respective professions such as electronic gadgets are also worshipped. Goddess Saraswati as the symbol of knowledge, music and arts is offered prayers to invoke her blessings. The importance of celebrating these festivals in a traditional manner helps in emphasizing their significance and also in inculcating cultural values in the younger generation.
Artistic Touch to Festive Decor by Nalini Malaviya, Art in Interiors, Art Scene India
Artist Shraddha Rathi, Image courtesy Rupali & Gaurav Bhatia
During this occasion, traditional arts and crafts can be used in décor to create an ethnic ambience that enhances the festive spirit, as well. Mysore and Tanjore paintings and folk and tribal art with its symbolism associated with festivities are some of the artworks that enrich the environment. Look for traditional paintings that depict scenes from the epics and narrate mythological stories. Oleographs and prints of paintings by Raja Ravi Varma and his contemporaries depicting vignettes from mythological texts add a great interest to the décor in terms of rarity, beauty and traditional significance.

Adapting the décor by accessorising around traditional thematic elements is a great way to highlight rich ancient content in a visual format and to create interesting and unusual décors. Art based on mythology and legends adds to the visual narrative and its rendition can be either traditional or contemporary.
Artistic Touch to Festive Decor by Nalini Malaviya, Art in Interiors, Art Scene India
Image courtesy pixabay

For instance, many contemporary artists transcribe text from religious books and scriptures on their paintings and also sculptures and installations which can add an interesting dimension to the festive décor. Incidentally, a few artists also paint musicians on their canvas and create sculptures around musical themes. These can form the perfect accessories in the décor.

The significance of music, musical instruments and other symbols of fine arts, learning and knowledge is primary during Ayudha Pooja and Vijayadashmi. A creative display of musical instruments, especially vintage instruments which exhibit a fine craftsmanship make for an interesting addition in the décor. Antique wood and brass instruments are not only rare, but also exceptionally beautiful and must be displayed with care. These can form the focal point in the décor and can be exhibited on raised platforms or pedestals. Use appropriate and creative lighting fixtures to highlight the aesthetic elements and craftsmanship of rare artefacts.

Similarly, unusual and antique statuettes, figurines and silver and brassware emphasise ethnic nuances and contribute to a traditional look and can be used as part of the décor or as functional objects.


The writer is an art consultant and curator

Published in Times Property, Bangalore 

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9 Sep 2017

Terra Firma in New Delhi

Looking for balance and harmony in nature


Terra Firma presents recent works by four leading artists of Karnataka - Milind Nayak, Gurudas Shenoy, Shirley Mathew and Praveen Kumar at the Habitat Centre, New Delhi. Their works relate to the existing urban scenario and reflect on issues related to humanity and its co-existence with nature. All four artists are proficient at expressing structural and natural forms, in various medium and distinctive colour palettes. Their paintings evoke poignancy and deep contemplation as they explore the urban landscape with all its inherent beauty and conflicts.
 Terra Firma in New Delhi, group show by 4 Karnataka artists, Art Scene India

24 Aug 2017

Art News: Heritage ‘per square feet’ at Venkatappa Art Gallery

 Measured per square feet from soil to sky!

Heritage ‘per square feet’ at Venkatappa Art GalleryThird in the Sambhrama series, Heritage ‘per square feet’, presents works by Mysore artists in an exhibition curated by Shoaib Chadkhan and Anil Chandran. The show offers paintings, performance, talk and panel discussion to probe, inquire and explore the subject in varied dimensions. The Karnataka artists' resistance to the adoption of Venkatappa Art Gallery (VAG) began in February 2016, and saw a series of artistic events and protests since then. 
As part of VAG Forum's ongoing artistic activities towards a creative reclamation of public space, organizing an art exhibition/event for 10 days once in 45 days, has been taken up by the VAG Forum, which comes under the name 'Sambhrama'.

Ganesha in Multiple Forms


Ganesha, symbolic of new beginnings, success, wisdom and generosity is worshipped on Ganesh Chaturthi, a Hindu festival that reveres the elephant God. The ten-day festival is celebrated starting on the fourth day of the Hindu luni-solar calendar month Bhadrapada, which typically falls in the months of August or September.

S.G.Vasudev, GANESHA 31cms x 31cms  Medium: Relief in copper
S.G.Vasudev, 31cms x 31cms, Relief in copper
The festival is marked with installation of Ganesha clay idols in homes, or in public spaces on elaborate pandals. It ends on the tenth day after start, wherein the idol is carried in a public procession with music and group chanting, then immersed in a nearby water body such as a river or ocean, thereafter the clay idol dissolves and Ganesha is believed to return to Mount Kailasha to Parvati and Shiva (source - Wikipedia)

With greater environmental awareness, there is an emphasis on eco-friendly materials  to minimise pollution of water bodies.

As the festival marks Ganesha's birthday, and celebrates him as the god of good beginnings, prosperity and obstacle remover, he is worshipped across the country with equal fervour during festivals, rituals and other celebrations.

18 Aug 2017

Bangalore Launch: 'Intelligent Field' by Surendra Kumar Sagar

'Intelligent Field' 

a new book by Surendra Kumar Sagar

'Intelligent Field` is Surendra Kumar Sagar's second book on science and philosophy with a similar objective as his first book 'SIX WORDS'  which aims to establish a model of philosophy that can lead towards convergence of religion with science to end conflicts and wars.
Intelligent Field a book by Surendra Kumar Sagar, launch at TERI, Bangalore, Art Scene India


17 Aug 2017

In Silence the Secret Speaks by Seema Kohli

The Golden Web
By 
Anjana Chandak

Anjana Chandak responds evocatively to the narrative performance by artist Seema Kohli, held recently at the National Gallery of Modern Art (NGMA) Bengaluru.

Poetry is not when you find a word rhyming with a word but poetry is created when you can find a word rhyming exactly with your feeling…And this is what artist Seema Kohli, who donned the cap of poetess made me feel, performing her poetic narration, ‘In Silence the Secret Speaks...’

The mirror pool at the NGMA provided the perfect womb to nurture the spirit of the artist who merged with the art through her own reflection. She transcended her paintings into verbal form through her palette of myriad emotions, painting it line by line; creating and narrating.
In Silence the Secret Speaks by Seema Kohli, narrative performance, Bangalore, writer Anjana Chandak for Art Scene India, Images courtesy writer

9 Aug 2017

Reasons To Visit The 2017 Venice Biennale

Reasons To Visit The 2017 Venice Biennale

by 
Shraddha Rathi

Contemporary artist, Shraddha Rathi shares her experience from her recent visit to the Venice Biennale and discovers how this international art exhibition combines the performing and visual arts in an ideation lab to create an ambience that involves all the senses.

Venice Biennale, Image courtesy Shraddha Rathi, Art Scene India
La Biennale de Venezia, the 57th international art exhibition titled ‘Viva Arte Viva’ curated by Christine Macel celebrates art, artists and the process of creation. Although, contemporary art documents and captures today's reality, the world itself is transforming and evolving with every passing moment. At this exhibition too, at times the exhibits reflect facts and reality, or give voice to a purpose, while at other moments it just celebrates the present.

This Biennale is mostly about an idea, where the material is a powerful medium of expression. The inventive use of materials to express an idea while playing with its strengths creates expansive, ingenious and successful forms of communication. In a cornucopia of materials, you experience a vast variety ranging from glass, bone, concrete, metal, wood, coffee and a whole lot of textile based works, apart from paintings, photographs and videos.


13 Jul 2017

Art and the Question of Authorship and Ownership in the Internet Era

 Art and the Question of Authorship and Ownership in the Internet Era

by  
Narendra Raghunath

In this article, Narendra Raghunath, visual artist and faculty, Srishti Institute of Art, Design and Technology, Bangalore draws on personal experience and discusses the complexities of authenticity, authorship and ownership rights of art and the 'image' in the contemporary art world.

A couple of years ago, I received an odd request from an unknown person in New York, to authenticate two works of mine. The work looked like mine, except it had some colour fading. It also had my name on the left bottom part in English, as I often write. The only problem was I had no Idea of such a sale or transfer. On further inquiry, I learnt that he sourced the work from a struggling Indian art student. During those days, if anyone would image search my work, Google strangely enough, showed a popular Hollywood actress’s name! This Indian student smartly used that opportunity and somehow managed to convince this poor chap that this actress was a big collector of my work.

Art and the Question of Authorship and Ownership in the Internet Era by Narendra Raghunath, Art Scene India
During that period, I also had a website where I occasionally published some of my explorations with the caption that ‘none of the works are for sale’. This smart student utilized all these to his advantage to fleece this investor – for a cool $4,800 - for the downloaded prints. But, once the collector began to have doubts about the signature in the authentication letter, he contacted me for verification. The entire episode filled me with mirth. I informed the buyer that there was a colour issue with the print and offered to send him a new set of prints of the same works with my pencil signature (courier costs to be borne by the collector). He happily agreed, and as I did not want the Indian student to get caught in a serious crime in the US, I left it that.

This entire episode provoked me into a deep philosophical question of authenticity of authorship and ownership of an artwork. History of art is filled with stories where the artists and their families died in poverty while their work, later on, made many others billionaires.

24 Jun 2017

Art News: Bangalore Art Scene

'The Unity of Opposites' by Tanya Mehta at Gallery Sumukha

The Unity of Opposites by Tanya Mehta at Gallery Sumukha
 A nationally and internationally exhibiting artist, Tanya Mehta works with photography and New Mixed Media to realise her vision through technology. She explores the gaps between our different constructions of knowledge – philosophy, art, science, the metaphysical – and finds, in those gaps, bridges. She hopes to take the audience over those bridges to move to the singular reality or truth that exists for all of us. The key is the imagination.

‘Unity of Opposites’ aims to explore the differences between human perception and reality through an understanding of non-dual opposites. Using portals, circular imagery and various looping mediums to depict the infinity of the universe around us, we explore the narrowness of human perception through what we define as opposites but are, in reality, unified.
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NGMA Bangalore in collaboration with BFS invites you to the screening of the films Child as an idea and image in cinema from 25th June 2017 @ 5.00 PM


NATIONAL GALLERY OF MODERN ART BENGALURU
(Ministry of Culture, Government of India)

in collaboration with

Bangalore Film Society

invites you for

CHILD
as an idea and image in CINEMA
NGMA Bangalore in collaboration with BFS invites you to the screening of the films Child as an idea and image in cinema from 25th June 2017 @ 5.00 PM

June 2017 screening of films 

All the films will start @5 pmEntry is Free on first come first serve basis. All are invited!


Children are everywhere in films – the child as a figure, an idea, image, narrative - a contested site of symbolism, romanticisation and controversy. The child is an ambivalent figure flitting between endurance and despair, vulnerability and violence. 

The films in this series examine the world from the child’s perspective. Here we see children who are dealing with serious situation like death, poverty, war and oppression. The films offer unique insights into these tiny minds who are witnessing and at the receiving end of harsh realities of life.  

Sunday 25th June 2017 
Pather Panchali / Satyajit Ray / 1955 / Bengali / 112 minutes

Pather Panchali is an adaptation of a 1929 novel by Bibhutibhushan Bandopadhyay. It was the first part in what became known as the Apu Trilogy, charting the life journey of a young boy in rural Bengal. Lyrical and sensitively observed, Pather Panchali documents the hardships of peasant life and the sadnesses of time passing, but doesn’t stint on the wonders and excitement of youthful discovery.


Tuesday 27th June 2017 

Ivan’s Childhood / Andrei Tarkovsky / 1962 / Russian / 95 minutes

The debut feature by Andrei Tarkovsky, Ivan’s Childhood is a poetic journey through the shards and shadows of one boy’s war-ravaged youth. Moving back and forth between the traumatic realities of World War II and serene moments of family life before the conflict began, Tarkovsky’s film remains one of the most jarring and unforgettable depictions of the impact of war on children.


Wednesday 28th June 2017 

The Spirit of the Beehive / Víctor Erice / 1973 / Spanish / 97 minutes

The protagonist Ana lives in a small village that is showing Frankenstein for the first time. While Ana wonders endlessly about the monster’s intentions, she stumbles upon a wounded revolutionary soldier who is hiding in a barn. The soldier’s death at the hands of the Francoist police, and Ana’s father’s anger over the situation lead to a strange hallucination in which Ana meets Frankenstein’s monster in the woods. Erice’s film is not only a subtle examination of Franco’s power, but it also introduces us to Ana, a dark-eyed child whose powerful gaze represented both an inquisitive youth and a rebellious spirit. Ana examines the world through an escapist fantasy, which takes her away from the realities of war. She represents the innocent generation of Spain that was unaware of Franco’s power and oppression.


Thursday 29th June 2017 

The Apple / Samira Makhmalbaf / 1998 / Persian and Azerbaijani / 86 minutes

The story of twelve-year-old sisters who have been kept confined in their home by their strict religious father and blind mother, who believe exposing their daughters to the outside world will lead to their corruption. It’s a film perched on the line between fact and fiction. Not only is the situation described a real one, but each of the characters in the ‘story’ is played by their real-life counterparts. When social workers force the parents to allow their daughters out into the street, the film documents the two sisters’ tentative first impressions of an outside world that’s so long been denied to them. Directed by Samira Makhmalbaf at the age of only 17, this astonishingly mature first feature combines a swipe at an oppressive society with a joyous ode to awakening senses.

Friday 30
th June 2017 
Kutty Japanin Kuzhandaigal (Children of Mini Japan) / Chalam Bennurakar /1990 / Tamil / 60 minutes 

This documentary is set in Sivakasi, a small town in Southern Tamil Nadu. It is from here and the surrounding villages that 70% of the requirements of the match box industry and 90% of the fireworks industry are produced. The owners of the match box and fireworks factories proudly refer to their town as “Mini Japan”, a self-employed town. This town also prints millions of garish calendars and election posters which are used all over India. Sivakasi has another dubious distinction. It is the single largest concentration of child labour in the world. Nearly 10,000 children, mostly girl children, are employed in Sivakasi to meet the demands of production. It is these children aged between 4 and 16 who are the protagonists of the film. The film is an attempt to portray their everyday lives, the production process and the complex socio-political reasons that contribute to such a large employment of children in this area.
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Ananya Drishya I Presentation by Amshu Chukki | 30th June 2017, Friday @ 6.00 pm | Venkatappa Art Gallery


Ananya Drishya I Presentation by Amshu Chukki | 30th June 2017, Friday @ 6.00 pm | Venkatappa Art Gallery,  Art Scene India
Amshu Chukki's practice ranges from site-specific ephemeral installations to drawing, video and sculpture. In his ongoing engagements with the notion of fictionalized spaces and narratives of dystopias, he is interested in the manner in which the boundaries between the real and illusory can fold into one another, keeping in mind an understanding of the filmic and in particular, the tropes of film noir. Further, questioning the ideas of the 'site', 'site specificity' and 'site informativity', his work tries to invite and involve audiences to speculate on the meaning and nature of the fictionalized worlds brought to life.
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RELOOK [35] : Lectures on Indian Art

Curated by Pushpamala N.

The "People without History": Forms of Cultural Memory and the Post-Colonial Archivea lecture by
Indira Chowdhury
Scholar and Archivist, Srishti Institute of Art, Design and Technology, Bangalore

On Sunday 2 July 2017 at 6.30 pm
at 1.Shanthi Road Studio/ Gallery, First Floor,
Shanthinagar, Bangalore 560027

About the Talk

This presentation draws on my attempts over the last decade and a half to create archives of different institutions and organisations and the insights gained from these attempts into the practice of archiving. Echoing the title of Eric Wolf’s 1982 book, Europe and the People Without History (1983) and drawing on the conceptual framework of Edward Said’s Orientalism (1979), this presentation looks back at the colonial collections of archives and material culture in India and asks in what ways is it possible to put together an archive within a postcolonial context? If colonial discourse defined Indians as being steeped in backward traditions and lacking in history, what conceptual problems do we encounter when trying to assemble an archive of a formerly colonised people? Beginning with my visit to a settlement of snake charmers near Sheopur, Madhya Pradesh, who claimed they knew nothing about snakes, I go on to look at the collection of botanical paintings at Lalbagh, and the subsequent setting up of the institutional archives of the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Indian Institute of Management, Kolkata, The Economic and Political Weekly and the Indian Museum. What does the process of archiving tell us about our relationship to the past? In what ways did institutions that originated in the colonial period reinvent their identities post-1947? How do the colonial foundations of academic disciplines shape the way our museums relate to the past? What roles do state interventions and notions of national identity play in the evolving sense of self? Do conceptualisations of education, development and progress erase forms of cultural memory and oral traditions and create reinvented identities? This presentation will attempt to show how we might re-understand the idea of collecting an archive and the critical ways in which we might interpret them.