Showing posts with label abstract art. Show all posts
Showing posts with label abstract art. Show all posts

8 Dec 2021

Tattvamasi by Artist Mohan Shingne

Spurts of Enigma: Nikhil Purohit writes on the art practice of Mohan Shingne 


An artist with formalist fervor operates both as an agent and a vessel for creation. Contemporary Indian art today is a mix-bag of several ideas from world art merged with indigenous aesthetic blends. It liberates an artist like Mohan Shingne to cross the roads with ideas of modernist abstraction and impulsive sculptural responses to a medley of found objects imparting meanings to resulting objects.

Untitled painting by Mohan Shingne, Art Scene India

A nuanced rendition through self-experienced perspective is the notion one ought to look for the works of Shingne rather than novelty. The artist has a dedicated hybrid practice. Firstly, of making sculptures with a conscious thematic of collaging shapes and found objects. Secondly, of paintings worked out as a process of self-exploration like an ardent devotee revealing the inner workings of a contemplative mind. He holds an intimate attachment to his role as an art educator besides following sculpting and painting as primary modes of expression.

With a humble upbringing in a family of goldsmiths, Mohan’s small and life size sculptures carry the craftsmanship and flair for detailing with a remarkable finesse. Poetry for him becomes a source for insinuating his feelings towards the inanimate world around that catches his attention. Words seem to be a storeroom to accumulate his notes for later visual conversions as idioms. It allows to gain a sense of Zen like feeling to learn how objects- mostly rustic, aged, and redundant become one with his psyche and finally at an immersive moment the object is released into a sculpture or flat surface. With a share of hardships in his early life the phase gifted him with a connect toward wordless conversations with things around. A link that has lent subtlety to his paintings and harmony to his 3D objects.

All this process hints at romance with formalism, yet Shingne finds gaps to escape rigidity in practice and breakthrough from monotony by experimenting with the found objects, clubbing them together. He happens to follow a formula of an uncanny juxtaposition where “Form + Form = Form, Form - Form=Form”. Perhaps the equation is an inert one where the principal element always stays. A philosophical take where the utilitarian thought in the object is discounted to abate a metaphor with mysticism.
 
Sculpture by Mohan Shingne, Art Scene India

The set of new achromatic works made during the nationwide COVID-19 pandemic lockdown period instills mixed feelings of emptiness, seclusion, loneliness, remorsefulness, silence, hope, and perseverance. The general theme of the series in dark shades with subtle textural notes has rectangular divisions annotated with few rhythmic curves breaking the grid formation. This releases the built-in tension formed after continuously watching the work. These works almost remind the ravishing paintings of veteran artist Jeram Patel, though the method of covering the space takes a different visual course. The underlying organic forms are nothing but triggers to melody.

One sculptural collage arouses satire and amuses us. The cylinder works were made by him before the onset of second wave where one could barely imagine how the situation could turn to be grave medically. Hailing from the goldsmith’s family these cans are part of his families’ occupational supplies. Mohan made use of these empty cans to revise their identity by introducing commonplace objects. The juxtaposition can only be admired by the viewer for the ease of mix-match where the two unrelated objects of a can and those of a buttermilk churner, a bowl, and an oil lamp respectively are bonded together. The experimenter within the artist allows spurts of delight and ecstasy.

Faithfully abiding by the tenets of formalism Mohan’s works continue to entice enigma.


Tattvamasi by Mohan Shingne, a Solo Show of Paintings and Sculpture continues till 10th December 2021 at Shridharani Art Gallery, New Delhi

6 Feb 2020

Art News: Unframed by Priyanka Sinha

Deconstructing Frameworks In Search Of The Sublime


In her new series of paintings, Priyanka Sinha explores the unknown and the arbitrary, and the elusive and the sublime. Attempting to deconstruct and remove frameworks, her abstract paintings delve deep into the mind in search of that ephemeral time and space, which cannot be categorised but depicts purity of mind and soul. 

Unframed by Priyanka Sinha
“Among the practising artists today, Priyanka Sinha stands out for her conviction, consistency and
maturity. Being an abstract painter, the struggle for survival is becoming increasingly difficult in
India. Today, a large number of abstract artists are trying to make success by attaching different kinds of philosophical (sometimes, even spiritual) sounding explanation with their work of art as a means to hide their deficiencies in artistic skills. In such an intensely market-driven world of art, the mediocrity is often hailed for the reasons we all are aware of,” writes artist and critic Ashok Bhowmick in the catalogue.


Being a well-trained artist, Priyanka is an immensely active art practitioner. It is not an urge for experimentation alone that drives her to accept newer challenges, but it is with her courage to create, she often forays into the unexplored zones of her own self to bring out something that makes her existence, meaningful. 

Unframed by Priyanka Sinha
Priyanka's recent works show that rare grit for which she is known for. After a considerable gap in time, she is showing her works and although she prefers to contain her expressions in monochrome only, the bundles of carefully etched parallel white lines bring in a refreshing light. Priyanka scratches the thick layers of colour to expose subtle parallel 'spaces' of her canvases, thus creating self-illuminating lines.

Her palette is full of the colours of the nature. In some paintings, she takes the colours from the sea while in some she borrows it from the seasons. With such colours, she composes her abstracts, but for the viewers, they appear as simple landscapes, seascapes and at times, even cityscapes. In her paintings, nothing happens accidentally, as every bit of it is not only planned but deeply meditated.
Unframed by Priyanka Sinha
The artist explains, “In my series named "Unframed" I have tried to present my sentiments in their sublime and pure form. The soul which has all power, and is the eternal core of our being and part of the creator. We look for materialistic happiness and want to be in our comfort zones. We want our life, relations, events, situations to manifest the way we desire. We want everything to happen in a particular manner, in well defined boundaries and frames.”

Unframed, an exhibition of Installations & Paintings by Priyanka Sinha will be on from 8-12th Feb at Fidelitus Gallery, Brigade Software Park, Banashankari 2nd Stage, Bangalore 560070
Mob: 080 680737001 E-mail: info@fidelitusgallery.com

All images are courtesy the artist

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4 Feb 2020

Interplay of Visual Contrasts


Juxtaposed by Vaman Pai and Gomathi Suresh at Gallery Manora
Painting by Vaman Pai
The ongoing exhibition of paintings by Vaman Pai and ceramics by Gomathi Suresh at Gallery Manora, explore abstract imagery through two diverse visual mediums. The show is curated by Giridhar Khasnis, who writes, “Involved in different mediums, they create works that are not fixed on any particular notion or theme but imagery that is free and open to interpretation. Silent yet evocative, their abstract constructs and formations are coloured with introspective tones and designs.”

Vaman is a Bangalore-based painter and sculptor, who is essentially self-taught. G S Shenoy, the late senior artist known for his abstracted landscapes had a large influence on his artistic vocabulary. Vaman has been painting landscapes for several years and in this series, his works display a natural fluidity and eloquence. There is an evident spontaneity in the rendering and an inclination to capture subtle atmospheric nuances. Inspired by nature, and the colour and vastness of the sky, he has employed a predominantly blue and white palette, experimenting adroitly with gentle patterns and textures.
Juxtaposed by Vaman Pai and Gomathi Suresh at Gallery Manora
Ceramic by Gomathi Suresh
Gomathi Suresh is a Sydney-based ceramist and art promoter, who has exhibited her works in several group shows and at the Ceramic Art School, Tafe Sydney where she completed her 2-year diploma in ceramic art. She is currently pursuing a 2-year advanced diploma in ceramic art.

In this series, which has been produced in response to Vaman’s paintings, her concern for environment, climate change and ecological sustainability form the underlying subtext. She explains, “My body of work for this exhibition is an immediate and gestural response to the painterly abstraction of Vaman Pai's works whilst maintaining the unique nature of my own making, use of surface treatment and three dimensionalities.” Her works often reference land forms and memories of landscapes from her travels around the world.
Juxtaposed by Vaman Pai and Gomathi Suresh at Gallery Manora
Gallery view of Juxtaposed by Vaman Pai and Gomathi Suresh at Gallery Manora

Adopting multiple techniques, ranging from the traditional to the more experimental, Gomathi has played with glazes and firing processes to achieve textures, patterns and compelling visual effects that emphasize colours and surface expanses. She says, “l have fired my works several times to achieve painterly, layered atmospheric depths, closely akin to watercolor effects on textured paper; deliberately exposing the marks of my making, just as a painter would with his brush strokes, creating abstract surfaces evoking perhaps the warmth of a sunrise, the mystery of a dark starry night, the glow of sunsets and or an icy bare landscape.”

The commonalities and contrasts explored in the exhibition form an interesting interplay of visual coherence through pluralities of materials and mediums, and artistic viewpoints.

The exhibition continues till Feb 20, 2020 at Gallery Manora

Gallery Manora
55,100 Ft Road Off,9th A Main, Indiranagar-1st Stage, Bengaluru 560038, INDIA.
www.gallerymanora.com


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All images are courtesy the gallery

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28 Nov 2019

Waves of Imagination by Humera Ali


Bangalore based artist Humera Ali presents her recent body of works in her second solo show at MKF Museum of Art. Employing abstraction as a tool to convey her concerns for nature and its conservation, Humera depicts landscapes as large expanses of textured colour fields. She says, “Unleashing years of latent creativity, the show is oriented from my love for nature that transforms my rendition in a natural leaning towards abstraction.”
Waves of Imagination by Humera Ali
Verge of Dawn

She attempts to capture the gentle gradients of the terrain, the glimmer of sunlight on land and water and the various movements observed in nature. “My brush strokes using acrylic medium are seen as ‘bold’ and pigments used as ‘strong’ while being inspired by pointillism and knife art as a medium and technique. Observing the veins of a leaf, the textures created in water on a pebble are details seen in my creations.”

Waves of Imagination by Humera Ali
Marine Collision
The lyrical movements, patterns and textures inherent in nature are translated on the canvas. “My series on water is to recreate the beauty of the sea in tranquillity or rippling waves on the sand as I observe and create forms through a rhythmic pattern. Every canvas translates into a meditative experience with the intention to take the viewer in a narrative that transcends into another realm of their imagination.” The tender approach to painting reflects in the serenity of the works and the light and shadow effects displayed through tonal variations.

Waves of Imagination by Humera Ali
Confluent
The series of works aims to also emphasize on the need for immediate action in cognizance of rapid urbanization, climate change and global warming. “I use the canvas to express my intense feelings with a strong message to conserve nature as global warming has given rise to water levels with repercussions of land that is fast receding.”

She emphasizes, “this show is a plea to all who respect the vagaries and strength in nature to continue the movement of protecting our planet.”

Humera is a self taught artist driven by passion, she was later mentored by the Bangalore based senior artist JMS Mani. Her works are part of collections in South Carolina, Sydney and Canada. She also does community service by giving art therapy to children with chronic illnesses providing them with a healing touch.



Meet the artist on 30th November 2019, 4 pm onwards

Waves of Imagination by Humera Ali, from 30th Nov - Dec 18, 2019 at MKF Museum of Art, 55/1 Isha Villa, Lavelle Road, Bengaluru 560001


Timing 11-7 pm.( (Monday closed.) Contact +91 7373 887 557

All images courtesy the artist


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25 Jul 2019

The Melancholy State of Happiness

Frames of Existence

Rekha Rao’s recent series of paintings ‘The Melancholy State of Happiness’ gravitates towards abstraction - fields of colour delineated by bold lines, discrete pigments and dense textures. Conceptually, her works are anchored around her response to her immediate environment, adopting an observational approach, yet an active witness to the rapidly changing times. In this body of works, her ecological concerns predominate and represent urban issues and challenges, such as those afflicting local water bodies and other prevailing calamitous outcomes. A minimal palette paints an evocative landscape that is at times subdued and subtle, and at other moments, bold and dramatic.

The Melancholy State of Happiness, painting by artist Rekha Rao
Red Rain
Rekha’s artistic journey has been unusual and perhaps even extraordinary, a result of an amalgamation of coincidence, destiny and circumstances. Born in 1947, during the year that India gained independence, she grew up in an artistic and politically charged environment that shaped her art practice to a large extent. In a newly formed nation, artists grappled with notions of identity and with reconciling the past with current global phenomena and trends. Politics, society, tradition and geography were key to charting discourses in the creative fields and influenced Rekha as well.

As a child, from the age of four, Rekha sketched and painted alongside her father, who went through each and every work of hers with immense pride. Hebbar believed that a formal art education would hamper her individuality and creative expression and encouraged her to study Indian History. He continued to mentor her through discussions, debates and regular practice. Reminiscing about her father, Rekha writes, he once said, inspiration from his children, especially Rekha - ‘whose view ceaselessly refreshed my own artistic perspective’.

The Melancholy State of Happiness, painting by artist Rekha Rao
Black Bat
Rekha’s first art exhibition was held at Jehangir Art Gallery in 1969. The foreword to this show was written by Karl Khandalawala, an eminent lawyer and authority on Indian Miniature Paintings, who had also been a mentor to Amrita Sher-Gil. Rekha was married the same year and then travelled to Los Angeles where she lived for two years. Khandalawala was in fact, instrumental in introducing her to the art world in Los Angeles. The experience of living in the United States enriched her understanding of global art, and writings related to feminism, gender and social inequity deepened her world view. This enabled her to revisit, review and reposition her beliefs, theories and principles related to ‘home’ and art.

Childhood memories have often been represented as a kaleidoscope of colours on the canvas, and she elaborates, “Colour has the power to embody and invoke light within each painting.” As a child her father often said that a painting is not a literal exercise where the viewer has to be supplied with a long explanation. “But it is the story of the artist, and whose vocabulary comprises the shapes, surface, texture and colour on the canvas.” Rekha remains a storyteller, weaving colours, textures and motifs into a layered narrative.

The Melancholy State of Happiness, painting by artist Rekha Rao
Drying Clothes
In 2003, she moved to Bangalore and has lived here since. She continues to work actively for issues close to her heart and runs a non-governmental organization Mali for underprivileged women. She is also a Trustee of the K K Hebbar Art Foundation, which supports deserving artists and art projects. 


Excerpted from the catalogue ‘The Melancholy State of Happiness’, recent works by Rekha Rao, written by Nalini S Malaviya.


The exhibition continues till August 4 at Saanchi Art Gallery, Bangalore International Centre, Domlur, Bangalore


All images courtesy the artist


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